Goodbye Wordpress, Hello Jekyll

You’ve crossed me for the last time WordPress. While I appreciate all your years of service, it’s time to go.

Goodbye WordPress

While I had found WordPress to be ‘ok’ and there does exist a plugin for everything under the sun.. Every few days I would get a notification that wordpress itself or one of the many diaspora of plugins would need an update, and then invariably something would break. Now I’m spending time not creating content, but just doing admin work trying to find all the places something may have gone wrong. God forbid, the hosting platform needed to upgrade the PHP runtime on the server.

Hello Jekyll

Jekyll has been around for a while, and I’ve been using it a bit over on GitHub. So it was time to take the plunge. Once I got over the initial hump of figuring out how the site was wired together, I was quickly able to get a simple theme together. Now I just needed my content.

I did say that WordPress had a plugin for everything, they even had a plugin for breaking up with WordPress. I installed the Jekyll Exporter plugin, and of course it didn’t work because it was conflicting with some other plugin. Eventually I was able to get it to spit out a zip file with all of my content, I dragged it over into my new project and BAM! Look at that, my whole site is back.

Damn is it fast!

I mean, of course it is, that is the point, you can’t really go faster than static content, but you kinda forget what that means in the modern web. Now that its fast, I also spent five more minutes tweaking a few accessibilty things so I would have 100s across the board in my lighthouse scores. That would have taken me ages in WP.

Tailing JSON log files

Sending JSON formatted logstash data into your ELK cluster is great. It is a real help when you are searching through the proverbial haystack in production for clues to what went wrong. However, sometimes when you are developing you might want to read the data off the test server just like it was going to your console … now you hate the JSON format. Tailing the logs is now basically worthless.

Here is a bash script that tails the log and just prints out the ‘@message’ field in the JSON object.

tail -f debug-json.log | \
  xargs -L1 --delimiter='\n' -n1  \
  python -c 'import json,sys; \
             d = json.loads(sys.argv[1]); \
             print d["@message"];';

Youtube SCORM Wrapper

This tool will take an YouTube video and wrap it into a SCORM 1.2 compliant package. The zip file can then be uploaded directly into your LMS.

The package will mark the lesson as completed with the video is completed. The amount of time the user watched the video is stored in ‘cmi.core.lesson_location’ for reporting of partial completion.


Asset ID:
Asset Title:
Organization ID:
YouTube Video ID:
 

Other SCORM Tools:

MP4 Video Scorm Wrapper

This tool will take an MP4 video and wrap it into a SCORM 1.2 compliant package. The zip file can then be uploaded directly into your LMS.

The package will mark the lesson as completed with the video is completed. The amount of time the user watched the video is stored in ‘cmi.core.lesson_location’ for reporting of partial completion.


Asset ID:
Asset Title:
Organization ID:
MP4 File:

This tool requires an HTML5 browser capable of using the FileReader API.

Other SCORM Tools:

Building a Yeast Starter – Recipie

A yeast starter is used to initiate cell activity or increase the cell count before using it to make your beer. The yeast will grow in this smaller volume, usually for 1-2 days, which then can be added to 5 gallons of wort.

IMG_20151228_091951

Time Required: 30 minutes

Items Required

  • Water
  • Ice
  • Small sauce pot
  • funnel
  • 1000 mL Erlenmeyer flask (pyrex)
  • Aluminum foil
  • Dry Maly Extract (DME)
  • Stir Plate / Stir Bar
  • Scissors
  • Thermometer
  • Star San
  • Yeast
  • Yeast Nutrient

Making A Starter

  1. If using liquid yeast as a source, activate the inner yeast pouch and allow to incubate
  2. Bring 650mL of water to a boil
  3. Remove water from heat
  4. Add 1/2 cup of DME, stir to mix, keep off heat to prevent scorching
  5. Return mixture to heat and gently boil for 15 minutes
  6. Sanitize the flask, scissors, thermometer, funnel, and stir bar
  7. When the mixture has finished boiling, use the funnel to transfer it to the flask
  8. Prepare an ice bath and place the flask into the bath, reduce the temperature of the mixture to 85 degrees (Fahrenheit)
  9. Add the stir bar, yeast, and 1/4 tsp of nutrient to the mixture and cover the mouth of the flask with the aluminum foil
  10. Place on the stir plate and allow to stir for 24 hours

To pitch the starter into a batch of beer remember to swirl the flask to pick up all the sediment, also use a magnet to hold the stir bar at the bottom of the flask to prevent it from falling into the fermentor.